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Author Topic: Dilemma  (Read 218 times)
saguaro
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« on: May 20, 2008, 07:40:51 PM »

What's up with Murphy's law?  I never subscribed, yet it seems my membership is always more than paid.
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janey
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« Reply #1 on: June 28, 2008, 08:22:01 AM »

The problem with Murphy’s Law is that it doesn’t really exist and indeed is an accident of history and faulty interpretation.  The real story is as follows:-

Long ago, in the hills overlooking what is now Pusan in Korea, there was the monastery known as the Temple of the Silent Gibbons.  It was the home of a silent order of Buddhist monks and was so named because of the colony of sacred gibbon monkeys who cohabited the hallowed halls of the ancient religious house.
The monks where duty bound to look after the Gibbons who had been bred over many centuries to be silent so as to preserve the tranquillity and peace that had reigned for millennia.
All this changed when a one sultry day in the summer of the year 365 the stillness was shattered by a loud and piercing call of HONG emanating from the trees by the meditation quarters. The monks where stunned and rushed over to see what was causing this terrible sound.
HONG
It was a monkey, a rather small threadbare monkey, but a monkey non-the less.
HONG.
What to do. The monkey could not be disposed of because it was sacred but it could not be allowed to make a noise, as the silence was also sacred.
HONG
The Abbot put up a notice that a meeting of all the monks would be held to see if there was a solution to this problem. Meetings, of course, were usually rather long drawn out affairs as there could be no speech involved. The discussion took place by means of the monks writing in turn upon a wall in the main hall and important issues could take several days to bring to a solution. However in this case the process was a relatively short one as the monks were all of one mind. One of the young acolytes at the Temple appeared to have a special affinity with the monkeys and it was thought by all that this apprentice monk could train the gibbon to be silent. And so each monk walked up to the wall and wrote upon it Murp Hy.
Murp Hy was given the sole responsibility of teaching the offending gibbon not to make a sound. He took the monkey into his small cramped cell to live with him and set about his task with trepidation. However as time went by the noise became less and less until after a year of Murp Hy’s labours the monastery was once again an oasis of silence and the Abbot breathed a silent sigh of relief.
The reason for his original concern was that in four years time the Dalai Lama himself was visiting the temple for the final judgement of the “Best Monastery (Silent order section)”, one of the most prestigious events of the Buddhist calendar. [Four years may seem a long time but as the position of Dalai Lama existed in perpetuity his diary was actually made out for 360 years in advance.]
And so the time came of the long awaited visit. The Dalai Lama spent several days in inspection and silent contemplation. Eventually the long awaited moment arrived and the monks gathered in the great hall to find out the result of his deliberations. The Dalai Lama stepped up to the writing wall, a warm smile on his face, charcoal stick poised to announce the result. The excitement of the monks had spread to the monkeys who could sense the tension in the air. Many of them gathered on the ledges of the windows above, through which the sunlight entered lighting up the sea of saffron robes below.
The charcoal touched the wall. The silent world held its breath. And up on the highest ledge it all got much too much for a certain small rather threadbare monkey who could hold things back no longer.
HONG
Four years of frustrating silence was ended with a sound that ripped and echoed through the hallowed halls and grounds. One or two of the monks audibly gasped and the Dalai Lama leaned against in shock.
It was the end of a dream; the Abbott was removed from his office and sent out as a wandering monk and the name of Murp Hy became a byword for failure. The story of course spread around the Buddhist world and wherever monks gathered they would discuss it, and eventually it started to be called Murp Hy’s law and it is this that has been distorted over the centuries into the incorrect version we use today: -

Murp Hy’s law states
Whatever can go Hong will go Hong and will go Hong at the most inconvenient time and place.

Definition 2

Murphyslaw:- A kind of salad very popular in Ireland.

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saguaro
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« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2008, 06:04:08 PM »

Thank you very much for clearing things up!!!
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DTM (Wet and grey)
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2008, 11:32:17 AM »

*cracking up* Very nice answer!
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